Windows 8 vs. Windows 7

Now that Microsoft’s Windows 8 operating system has hit the release-to-manufacturing (RTM) stage, it’s time to see how it stacks up against the incumbent Windows 7.   A number of people have released benchmark testing. After reviewing a couple of these, here’s what we can determine:

The first and most obvious is that Microsoft has obviously worked hard to cut system boot times, as Microsoft previously promised.

We don’t reboot our PCs anywhere near as often as we once did, but a fast boot up time is still appreciated, and a PC that arrives at the logon screen or desktop quickly makes a good impression on both Microsoft and OEMs.

Hybrid boot, UEFI firmware and better use of sleep will make startup under Windows 8 even faster.

Next there’s the fact that, as far as the synthetic and gaming benchmarks go, the differences between Windows 7, the Windows 8 RTM, the Consumer Preview and the Release Preview are negligible. It usually takes AMD and NVIDIA some time to optimize and perfect their drivers for a new operating system, with drivers having to mature for several months before we see similar performance between the new operating system and the old one.

This time around it seems that things have settled down quickly and that we’re seeing performance that is on a par with a mature operating system. We can assume that as time goes on the graphics card makers will be able to squeeze more performance out of the operating system.

This is good news for anyone who is planning to make a swift switch to Windows 8 but also for those who want the best performance possible from their hardware.

We’re also seeing quite an improvement when it comes to audio and video transcoding. It’s an area that Microsoft seems to put effort into improving, and that trend continues with Windows 8. As we take more photos and video and handle more content, the ability to process them faster is welcome all round.

From a performance perspective, I’ve very pleased with the way that Windows 8 has turned out. While there are no major performance differences between the Windows 8 Release Preview and the newly released Windows 8 RTM version, performance seems solid, and in areas where the platform lagged behind Windows 7, Microsoft seems to have put in the effort to close the gap.

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About SCB Enterprises
System Solutions and Integration

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